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HomePolicy Articles Article Summary

Economic Transformation North of 60°

Report by Roxanne Ali

Roxanne Ali’s report follows from a Public Policy Forum conference in December 2006 on the promises and policy challenges of northern development. The report focuses on Canada’s foreign policy in the north, the creation of partnerships, good governance, and sustainable economic development. Ali notes that maintaining a Canadian presence in the north is important, but can be accomplished through satellite surveillance rather than military missions. Canada’s claim to the north is particularly important in light of the need for research on climate change; the report suggests that climate change may provide the catalyst for government to make a new national plan for foreign policy in the north.

With regard to governance and partnerships, Ali notes the will of territorial and Aboriginal governments to achieve greater fiscal capacity as members of the Canadian federation. The author’s report highlights the desire of northern leaders to acquire more provincial responsibilities, yet also notes the difficulties that plague the north in terms of the multi-layered government structures between band, territory, and the federal governments. Lastly, the report points out that sustainable development of the northern economy is difficult to achieve.

According to the author, balancing the integration of the economy against social and environmental concerns is a more acute problem in the north than anywhere else as the pains of global warming have already taken a toll on social traditions and the environment. In her report, Ali recommends that northern communities must share in the benefits that accrue from non-renewable resources. She also recommends that education and human resource management is essential to the development of the north. Further, education in Inuktitut is essential to preserving the Aboriginal culture of the northern communities, and development cannot take place without the federal government addressing critical issues of poverty, housing, and social infrastructure.

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Policy Publication Details

Author(s): Roxanne Ali;
Publisher: Public Policy Forum [ Visit Website ]
Year Published: 2007; Publisher Type: Research Institute
Publicly Available: Yes Research Focus: Provincial;
Registration Required: No Language: English
Payment Required: No Publication Format: Adobe PDF

Subjects / Categories:

Policy Articles / Aboriginal / Inuit & Innu
Policy Articles / Aboriginal / Indian & Northern Affairs
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Regional Development
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Northern Canada
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Oil & Gas
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Mining
Policy Articles / Aboriginal
Policy Articles / International Law & Politics
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral
Policy Articles / International Law & Politics / Foreign Policy
Policy Articles / Aboriginal / Indian & Northern Affairs / 2007
Policy Articles / Aboriginal / Inuit & Innu / 2007
Policy Articles / International Law & Politics / Foreign Policy / 2007
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Mining / 2007
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Oil & Gas / 2007
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Northern Canada / 2007
Policy Articles / Regional & Sectoral / Regional Development / 2007


Keywords / Tags:

canada; arctic; northern; inuit; governance; sovereignty; foreign policy; partnership; investment; mining; education; human resources; sustainable development;