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HomePolicy Articles Article Summary

Lockstep in the Continental Ranks: Redrawing the American Perimeter After September 11th

Report by Stephen Clarkson

Stephen Clarkson’s paper Lockstep in the Continental Ranks: Redrawing the American Perimeter After September 11th, argues it is difficult to know what the result of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington will be on Canada-US relations. Clarkson emphasizes three issues Canadians face when looking at US actions: 1) the nature of the US in the face of non-state violence; 2) Canada’s international position vis-à-vis American responses; and, 3) the nature of the North America that Washington keeps redefining. Clarkson asserts that in the post-September 11th world what Washington wants will continue to triumph in the asymmetrical relationship between Canada and the US. He also contends, however, that Canada will work hard to influence impact what Washington wants. Clarkson concludes that only time will tell if these efforts result in deeper North American integration.

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Policy Publication Details

Author(s): Stephen Clarkson;
Publisher: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives [ Visit Website ]
Year Published: 2002; Publisher Type: Research Institute
Publicly Available: Yes Research Focus: International;
Registration Required: No Language: English
Payment Required: No Publication Format: Adobe PDF

Subjects / Categories:

Policy Articles / International Law & Politics / Canada - U.S. Relations
Policy Articles / International Law & Politics
Policy Articles / International Law & Politics / Canada - U.S. Relations / 2002


Keywords / Tags:

September 11th; United States; Canada; North America; Canada-US relations; asymmetrical bilateralism; integration;