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Home Policy Articles: International Law & Politics: Canada - U.S. Relations

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A Friendly Agreement in Advance: Canada-US Defense Relations Past, Present, and Future popular

The author of this article, J.L. Granatstein, argues that Canada has no choice but to support the United States in an expanded anti-terrorism war, as well as in a National Missile Defense (NMD) scheme proposed by the Bush Administration. Granatstein explains that the two countries have been linked in defense for over 60 years, and that, as such, Canada’s refusal to participate in joint defence programs would inevitably carry real costs. Considering that the US will defend itself regardless of Canada’s position, Granatstein asserts that Canada must participate in defence programs – if only to protect its sovereignty. Granatstein suggests that by participating, Canada can maintain its seat at the defence table, which should, in turn, strengthen Canada’s bargaining position on trade issues.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/commentary_166.pdf

Renewing the U.S. - Canada Relationship popular

This report considers the breakdown of the Canada - U.S. relationship and how this development has affected both countries. The report concludes that much of the breakdown has been due to the fall of communism and the resulting loss of common goals. The document encourages a renewed relationship and emphasizes new reasons for Canada and the U.S. to work together.
http://www.americanassembly.org/programs.dir/report_file.dir...

Will We Rise to the Challenge? Eight Mega Issues Facing Canada popular

This briefing tracks eight key trends that are having a major impact on Canada’s business and public policy environment. Charles Barrett and Anne Golden point to the global economy and the consequences of competition from developing countries. They examine Canada’s relationship with the United States and the competing priorities of defence and trade. They also look at the need for investment in human capital and innovation for Canada to compete on the global stage, as well as the importance of addressing climate change and environmental issues.
http://sso.conferenceboard.ca/e-Library/Document.asp?DID=637...

A Canadian Response to an American War

In this brief paper, Avi Lewis critiques the American war in Iraq and discusses how, in his view, it reflects the growth of an “Ownership Society,” in which greater emphasis is placed on the individual, with many left to suffer.
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/documents/National_Office_P...

California Dreaming: The Fantasy of a Canadian-Style Health Insurance Monopoly in the United States

The stated purpose of Brett Skinner and Mark Rovere’s article is to “warn Americans about the dangerous ideas contained in the Universal Health Insurance bill.”
http://www.fraserinstitute.ca/admin/books/files/CaliforniaDr...

Canada and the Global Challenge: Finding a Place to Stand

At the time of this article’s writing, Canada’s last comprehensive foreign policy review was completed in 1995. In this context, its authors argue that a new foreign policy dialogue, launched in January 2003, would serve as a tentative step toward recognizing the need for a fresh look at Canada and the world.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/commentary_180.pdf

Civil Society and North American Integration

Laura Macdonald argues that recent proposals put forward to deepen North American integration have largely ignored the role of civil society.
http://www.irpp.org/miscpubs/archive/NA_integ/wp2004-09e.pdf...

Course Correction: Advice on Canada’s Future Foreign Policy

This report was submitted to the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (as it existed at the time of this paper’s writing); it is centred on discussions stemming from the Consultative Forum on Canada’s Role in the World, held in April 2003. The forum was organized by the Conference Board of Canada, and included participants from Canada’s business community. The main argument of this submission is simply that the prosperity pillar remains critical to Canada’s foreign policy.
http://sso.conferenceboard.ca/e-Library/Document.asp?DID=542...

Deeper, Broader: A Roadmap for a Treaty of North America

This paper is part of a book-length publication, edited by Courchene, Savoie and Schwanen, which contains papers that were presented at the “Art of the State” Conference, hosted by the IRPP and held in October 2003. This conference featured experts from Canada, Mexico and the United States who came together to explore new ideas, new instruments and new processes for enriching the North American experience. The main goal of the conference was to remedy gaps in public discourse, while at the same time understanding how three sovereign nations could advance common causes and manage their increasing interdependence.
http://www.irpp.org/books/archive/schwanen_roadmap.pdf

In Search of a New Equilibrium in the Canada-U.S. Relationship

This Conference Board Report cites the need for a new balance in Canada’s relationship with the United States. It suggests that some inherent dilemmas must be confronted, the most crucial of which is the unequal power relationship between the two countries. Despite the naturally predominant position of the US, however, the Report suggests that Canada does not always need to follow American policies.
http://sso.conferenceboard.ca/e-Library/Document.asp?DID=115...

Lockstep in the Continental Ranks: Redrawing the American Perimeter After September 11th

Stephen Clarkson’s paper Lockstep in the Continental Ranks: Redrawing the American Perimeter After September 11th, argues it is difficult to know what the result of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington will be on Canada-US relations. Clarkson emphasizes three issues Canadians face when looking at US actions: 1) the nature of the US in the face of non-state violence; 2) Canada’s international position vis-à-vis American responses; and, 3) the nature of the North America that Washington keeps redefining. Clarkson asserts that in the post-September 11th world what Washington wants will continue to triumph in the asymmetrical relationship between Canada and the US. He also contends, however, that Canada will work hard to influence impact what Washington wants. Clarkson concludes that only time will tell if these efforts result in deeper North American integration.
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/documents/National_Office_P...

Managing Global Crises – and the U.S. Colossus

In this report, David Wright argues that Canada should never blindly follow the United States vis-à-vis decision-making around international crises. On the other hand, he argues that Canadians should never feel inadequate or irrelevant when they do support U.S. positions, especially on security issues. Wright suggests that Canada should take positions on international issues that are based on its interests and consistent with its values.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/commentary_207.pdf

Mapping the New North American Reality - Introduction

This brief report serves as the introduction to Mapping the New North American Reality, a series of brief articles written by Canadian, American, and Mexican policy experts exploring the nature of North American economic integration.
http://www.irpp.org/miscpubs/archive/NA_integ/wp2004-09.pdf

Of Independence and Faustian Bargains: Going Down the Deep Integration Road with Uncle Sam

In this article, Bruce Campbell explores how Canada can continue to maintain its independence in the face of ongoing North American integration. He argues that two changes in the political landscape over the last 15 years have intensified this challenge: 1) the Bush Pax Americana, whose mission to maintain global dominance has little patience for working in concert with the international community, and 2) the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which the author contends is deeply flawed.
http://www.policyalternatives.ca/documents/National_Office_P...

Renewing the Relationship: Canada and the United States in the 21st Century

In this brief report, Barrett and Williams argue that it is critical for Canada to be clear on the future direction of our most important internal relationship: that with the United States. They contend that decisions made over the months and years following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 will define the relationship for years to come. Further, they argue that with the United States focusing on global security concerns, Canada must take the first steps in defining a future Canada-US relationship.
http://sso.conferenceboard.ca/e-Library/Document.asp?DID=512...

Romanticism and Realism in Canada’s Foreign Policy

This lecture, delivered by former Canadian Ambassador to the United States Allan Gotlieb, presents a review of Canada’s past foreign policy while drawing a picture of how the nation can best pursue its interests abroad. Gotlieb’s key point is that Canada’s postwar foreign policy has shifted uneasily, and often to the country’s detriment, between realism and romanticism. He argues that romanticism does not serve the nation well when it fails to promote Canada’s practical interests.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/benefactors_lecture_2004.pdf

The Art of the State II (Folio 7)

This book-length publication, edited by Courchene, Savoie and Schwanen, contains papers that were presented at the “Art of the State” Conference, hosted by the IRPP and held in October 2003. This conference featured experts from Canada, Mexico and the United States who came together to explore new ideas, new instruments and new processes for enriching the North American experience. The main goal of the conference was to remedy gaps in public discourse, while at the same time understanding how three sovereign nations could advance common causes and manage their increasing interdependence.
http://www.irpp.org/books/archive/AOTS2/folio_7.pdf

The Art of the State II: Folio 8

This book-length publication, edited by Courchene, Savoie and Schwanen, contains papers that were presented at the “Art of the State” Conference, hosted by the IRPP and held in October 2003. This conference featured experts from Canada, Mexico and the United States who came together to explore new ideas, new instruments and new processes for enriching the North American experience. The main goal of the conference was to remedy gaps in public discourse, while at the same time understanding how three sovereign nations could advance common causes and manage their increasing interdependence.
http://www.irpp.org/books/archive/AOTS2/folio_8.pdf

The Art of the State II: Thinking North America – Folio 1

This book-length publication, edited by Courchene, Savoie and Schwanen, contains papers presented at the “Art of the State” Conference, hosted by the IRPP and held in October 2003. This conference featured experts from Canada, Mexico, and the United States who came together to explore new ideas, instruments, and processes for enriching the North American experience. The main goal of the conference was to remedy gaps in public discourse, while at the same time broaden understanding how three sovereign nations could advance common causes and manage their increasing interdependence at the same time.
http://www.irpp.org/books/archive/AOTS2/folio_1.pdf

The North American Imperative: A Public-Good Framework for Canada-U.S. Economic and Security Cooperation

In this report, William B.P. Robson argues that securing proposed economic and security improvements between Canada and the United States requires that people in both countries (and particularly Canadians) think more boldly, and develop a strategy framework that focuses on North American ‘public goods.’ Robson points out that public goods, which are familiar in domestic activities, have international counterparts: areas where coordinated contributions yield payoffs larger than individual countries can realize acting on their own.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/commentary_204.pdf

The Transboundary Water Resources of Canada and the United States

This report considers the impact shared freshwater resources have had on the U.S.-Canadian relationship. Strategies for maintaining a positive relationship and preserving water resources are considered.
http://www.ciia.org/SGFinal.pdf

U.S. Bilateral Free Trade Accords: Why Canada Should Be Cautious About Going to Same Route

In this Commentary Danielle Goldfarb considers the implications that the numerous American Bilateral trade agreements might have on Canada. Her concern comes from the idea that without Canada being present at the negotiating table both Canadian interests and the stake that Canada has in American trade policy may be undermined. Although Goldfarb recognizes that the impacts may not be incredibly large, she feels government ought to involve themselves. Goldfarb then explains that the Canadian strategy has been to make numerous bilateral agreements with other nations.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/commentary_214.pdf

US and Canadian Immigration Policies: Marching Together to Different Tunes

This article by Peter Rekai argues the United States and Canada should continue their trend towards greater bilateralism to resolve what are decidedly bilateral issues, namely the issue of security following the terrorist attacks on the US of September 11, 2001. In this context, Rekai, focuses on immigration policy. He finds that Canada has tightened its immigrant and refugee screenings, but has not followed the US example and improved its screening of temporary workers and visitors; for Rekai this is a “particularly troubling omission” considering the ease with which potential ‘harm doers’ could use temporary visas as a means of entry.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/rekai.pdf

Values of the Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement

Audrey Macklin examines a Canada - US agreement which would deflect Canada-bound Asylum seekers who pass through the United States. She discusses this agreement in relation to security and Canada-US relations.
http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/558320703%2Epdf

What Canadians Have to Say About Relations With the United States

As Alexandroff and Guy point out, since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 Canada’s relationship with the United States has been under intense scrutiny. They also note that this scrutiny has increased even further, with Canada’s refusal to support the US-led invasion of Iraq. In this paper the authors explore the attitudes of the Canadian public towards a closer relationship with the United States.
http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/backgrounder_73.pdf